LEXUS

DESIGN HAS THE POWER TO MAKE THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE

2018 CO-

  • PRESENTING THE GRAND PRIX WINNER

    Testing Hypotheticals by Extrapolation Factory

    A collaboratively imagined test site that explores speculative relationships between society, technology and the environment.

  • 2018 Creative Theme “CO-”

    “CO-”, the Latin prefix meaning with or together in harmony. Lexus believes that great design can ensure the harmonious coexistence of nature and society. In that sense, “CO-” is an approach that allows Lexus to explore its true potential and that of the environment by creating new possibilities through collaboration, coordination and connection.

2018 EXPLORING THE THEME CO-

“CO-” is a Latin prefix meaning with or together in harmony.
At Lexus, we seek the harmonious coexistence of nature and society through sustainable design. “CO-” is an approach that allows us to explore our potential and that of our environment by creating new possibilities through collaboration, coordination, connection, and the like.

LEXUS DESIGN AWARD 2018

JUDGES

MENTORS

2017 EXPLORING THE THEME YET

The ‘YET' philosophy is at the heart of Lexus' creative mindset and drives Lexus to push the boundaries of creativity by fusing seemingly incompatible elements. It says “Don't compromise; harmonize.” The resulting synergy sparks breakthroughs, while revealing possibilities beyond imagination.

2017 LEXUS DESIGN AWARD

JUDGES

MENTORS

2016 EXPLORING THE THEME ANTICIPATION

At Lexus, we strive to develop products and services by anticipating the needs of people and society.

2016 LEXUS DESIGN AWARD

JUDGES

MENTORS

2015 EXPLORING THE THEME SENSES

Senses is particularly relevant to Lexus, as the whole driving experience is about senses: from seeing the vehicle styling, to hearing the sound of the finely tuned engine, to feeling the luxurious leather seats, and smelling that "new car smell". Everything is engaged. By considering this array of examples, Lexus seeked to appeal to the senses in an ever-unique manner.

2015 LEXUS DESIGN AWARD

JUDGES

MENTORS

2014 EXPLORING THE THEME CURIOSITY

At Lexus, we spend a great deal of our time thinking about the serious matter of how to improve our designs and their impact on the world. It is also important that what we produce remains exhilarating for our customers. Applying our curiosity in a creative manner can result in unexpected innovation that change lives.

2014 LEXUS DESIGN AWARD

JUDGES

MENTORS

2013 EXPLORING THE THEME MOTION

Motion - a word and concept directly connected to people´s everyday lives. Under this theme, Lexus welcomes innovators and calls for works that display a deep understanding of Lexus design, uniquely interpret concepts and provide original perspectives on and solutions to various issues of daily life.

2013 LEXUS DESIGN AWARD

JUDGES

MENTORS

CATEGORIES

Fashion

CATEGORIES

Technology

CATEGORIES

Products

CATEGORIES

Environmental

JUDGES

Throughout the competition, judges renowned in design and various related fields, deliberate over thousands of entries to select four prototype winners, eight panel finalists and the eventual grand prix winner.

MENTORS

Globally well-known creators, the Mentors assist the four prototype winners to bring their ideas to life.

Testing Hypotheticals

2018 GRAND PRIX WINNER

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A collaboratively imagined test site that explores speculative relationships between society, technology and the environment.

Architect Michael Reynolds, who worked on the Sustainable Development Testing Sites Act in New Mexico in 2007, described his project: “Just as special racetracks are used to test automotive safety outside the public highway system, this piece of legislation allows testing of housing and living methods in a day-to-day living circumstance, with real people.”

Extrapolation Factory similarly proposes to set up a futures workshop in which they work with locals in neighborhoods to envision spaces that communities could use as test grounds for new ways of living and working. This studio will work with participants to identify key aspects or issues that concern the neighborhood, and then develop ideas for how these issues could be explored and changed through development within a testing site. What physical structures, systems, mechanisms, social situations, economies, etc. could be instituted to experiment with alternative ways of living/working that could offer better alternatives than the ones that currently exist? Over the course of the workshop, Extrapolation Factory will help participants to construct prototypes that bring the ideas to life, assembled to form an immersive test site.

Designer: Extrapolation Factory

Extrapolation Factory is a design-based research studio for participatory futures studies, founded by Elliott P. Montgomery(USA) and Chris Woebken(Germany). The studio develops experimental methods for collaboratively prototyping, experiencing and impacting future scenarios.

Extrapolation Factory

Mentor: Formafantasma

Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin are Studio Formafantasma, Italian designer duo based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. They have developed a coherent body of work characterized by experimental material investigations and explored issues such as the relationship between tradition and local culture, critical approaches to sustainability and the significance of objects as cultural conduits. Their work has been presented and published internationally and museums such as New York's MoMA, London's Victoria and Albert, New York's Metropolitan Museum, the Chicago Art Institute, the Textiel Museum in Tilburg, the Stedelijk's-Hertogenbosch, MUDAC Lausanne, the Mint Museum of Craft and Design in North Carolina and the MAK Museum in Vienna have all acquired Formafantasma's designs for their permanent collections. Andrea and Simone are lecturing and heading workshops in various Universities and Institutions. Currently teaching at the ‘Well Being' and 'Contextual Design' Departments of the Design Academy Eindhoven and they are at the head of the Design bachelor at MADE Program in Siracusa, Italy.
Formafantasma

CO-RKs

2018 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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A generative system connecting cork thread, a sustainable material and computational process that generate design products.

CO-RKs is a generative system that generates design products based on the connection between computational/algorithmic processes and a sustainable, innovative and versatile material: cork thread by In.Filo. This system can create forms such as lamps, chairs, tables and spaces - exhibition structures.

Designer: DIGITALAB

Ana Fonseca and Brimet Silva(Portugal) are the founders of DIGITALAB, a young, multidisciplinary and experimental architecture, design and reasearch studio. They studied at the Department of Architecture of the University of Coimbra (Portugal) and RWTH Aachen University (Germany). DIGITALAB explores forms and spaces associated with computational generative design, digital fabrication and new materials.Currently, the studio is developing projects on different scales in the areas of architecture and design, with strong links to industry.

DIGITALAB

Mentor: Lindsey Adelman

Decades before founding her eponymous studio, Lindsey Adelman was already designer — just not publicly so. First, she was simply a precarious, curious child, building endlessly in the backyards of suburban New York, uncertain of how to make a career of it; then, an English student at Kenyon College; then, on the editorial staff at The Smithsonian Institutione. Fortunately, there, her accidental discovery of industrial design — in the literal form of a fabricated foam French fry — propelled her off to RISD to make a life of that childhood passion. Today, from her studios in New York and Los Angeles, she manipulates light to create fixtures that are as emotive as they are physically transformative — objects imbibed with their own history and meaning, often unselfconsciously so, that give color and texture and depth to the world around them.
Lindsey Adelman

Honest Egg

2018 PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARD WINNER

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Connecting technology and new design interface to show egg's edibility.

Honest egg is an intuitive and simple indicator when an egg has reached its recommended consumption date. To overcome the problem of ambiguous dating or whether the egg is safe to consume, the user can observe a graphical image or word on the egg shell to determine the egg's edibility. Honest Egg goes through a process of eggs being printed with an intelligent ink pigment that have the capability to change color in response to a pre-calibrated time period. If a cracked egg-shell or a sudden change in CO2 levels or temperature is detected, the Honest Egg indicator can reduce the edibility date period significantly.



Potentially, the Honest Egg indicator will give a level of reliability and confidence to the end user when determining if the egg is safe to consume before making a conscious decision to discard it into the bin. Furthermore, the egg is packaged in a recyclable container. Pulp packaging design lined with compressed hay create a harmonious natural egg fitting. The top side has cavity holes to reveal the edibility/bad egg ink pigment without needing to open the box.

Designer: aesthetid

Malaysia based Industrial Designers, Paul Yong Rit Fui and Jaihar Jailani Bin Ismail co-founded aesthetid, a design consultancy based in Johor Bahru, specializing in Product Design, Graphics and Design Language services. They believe in making technology, business and design a natural symbiotic experience, uncovering user needs, behavior and desires.

aesthetid

Mentor: Jessica Walsh

Jessica Walsh is a designer & art director working as a partner at NYC based design firm Sagmeister & Walsh. She lectures about design at creative conferences and universities internationally and teaches design at The School of Visual Arts in NYC. Her work has won numerous awards from most major design competitions including Type Director's Club, Art Director's Club, SPD, Print, New York Festivals, D&AD, TDC Tokyo, and Graphis, among many others. She has been awarded Forbes “30 under 30 top creatives designing the future” and Ad Age's “Top 10 Visual Creatives”. Her work has been featured in numerous books & magazines. Clients include the Museum of Modern Art, The Jewish Museum, Jay-Z, Snapchat, Barneys, The New York Times, Levis, Adobe, and Her blog & book “40 Days of Dating” received over 10 million readers and is currently being turned into a movie by Warner Brothers.
Jessica Walsh

Recycled Fiber Planter

2018 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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Co-fusion textile and green design to repurpose used clothes.

In Japan, approximately 1.5 tons of clothing products are thrown out annually and less than 15% is recycled. Moreover, most of today’s clothing market consists of fast fashion driving production speed and quantity, but at the same time is the cause of major waste issues. Recycling clothes is not a new practice and there are businesses today that tear old apparel and/or collect discarded fiber materials to reconstruct them into batten cotton material. The most common uses of the material is felt and interior cushioning of car seats, but there could be other uses.

This project came from the idea of creating a substitute for soil called fiber soil by recycling old clothes made from polyester fiber. The goal is to combine a material with low recycling potential with more recyclable materials to increase the chances of reuse. The colors of the fiber soil come from the sorting and mixing the colors of the old clothes collected. In order for plants to grow, the material was formed through compression so that it contains adequate moisture and air. Layering different colors of the thin sheets of fiber soil’s recycled batten cotton material also creates more complex colors. This planter is very soft to the touch, which is one of the features of textile products people tend to focus on. “CO-” is a fusion of textile and plant. In addition to attract people’s interest in the sustainable use of resources, this planter can change the way people and plants interact.

Designer: Eriko Yokoi

Yokoi(Japan) received her Master's degree in textile design from Tama Art University. In 2016, she did an exchange program at the Royal College of Art, in the textile course. After graduating from the Product Department at Tama Art University, she worked as a socks designer. Her vision is to explore cross-cutting research.

Eriko Yokoi

Mentor: Sou Fujimoto

Sou Fujimoto was born in Hokkaido in 1971. Graduated from the Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering at Tokyo University, he established Sou Fujimoto Architectsin 2000. In 2016, he has won the 1st prize for“Pershing”, one of the sites in the French competition called 'Réinventer Paris', following the victories in the Invited International Competition for the New Learning Center at Paris-Saclay's Ecole Polytechnique and the International Competition for the Second Folly of Montpellierin 2014. In 2013, he became the youngest architect to design the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London. His notable works include; “Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013” (2013), “House NA” (2011), “Musashino Art University Museum & Library” (2010), “Final Wooden House” (2008), “House N” (2008) and many more.
Sou Fujimoto

VNWALLS GARDEN

2018 PANEL FINALISTS

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An aeroponic planting machine that contribute to the modern agriculture and farming methods.

VNWALLS GARDEN is an automated indoor machine that can grow most seedlings, vegetables, fruits, herbs and other small plants. Providing additional adequate organic substrates into residential water, aeroponic is a modern farming method takes advantage in saving water and active control growing processes.

A carefully designed air filter removes dust particles and odors, contributes to the photosynthesis process, in which plants use energy from suitable LED light, carbon dioxide and water to produce glucose and oxygen, and projects purified air outside. The user-friendly horticulture design also features lift door fitting which allows for space-saving accommodation, while the inclined trays, very low noise operation, and light weight are ideal for any space, including apartments, houses, stores, offices, restaurants, labs, etc.

The machine itself houses a set of 4 stacked trays, 180 naturally sponge pods equivalent to a 2.4 square meter garden. Built-in uninterruptable power storage extends maximum operations up to 24 hours without main power. Users can directly control VNWALLS GARDEN with the integrated operating system, or via smartphone application. Other features include up-to-date status synchronized with a cloud-based server know-how to assists customers right on time. The machine guarantees the best growing conditions and contributes to industry 4.0 development trend.

Designer: VNWALLS

VNWALLS (Nguyen Tien Phuoc (Vietnam), Pham Anh Tuan (Vietnam), Truong Ngoc Phu (Vietnam)) is high a tech company, focus on changing the way we life by technology and modern farming methodology,
also changing the poor image of Vietnamese’s product quality in the eye of the world. Phuoc Nguyen is an engineering-based designer, currently he is supporting some ambitious startups.

VNWALLS

Fabric Block

2018 PANEL FINALISTS

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Co-merging softness and hardness a project that explores new ways to fabricate various objects.

Fabric Block is a malleable reusable fabric cloth which can be utilized in a variety of ways: a network system, toy, architectural structure, and more. Prototypes employ new methods of fabric forms to explore the structural performance of catenary shapes found in thin shells.

The process of Fabric Block’s creation involves filling a suspended sewn fabric with earth and then its 3D shape is manipulated into a soft assembly form by wrapping it around a pre-casted block. The soft form is then hardened by a solution and the earth is emptied out, leaving behind a semi-opaque, free-standing, super lightweight shell. Fabric Block can be adaptable depending on its materials and adjusting the hardness and softness with the hardening solution. Future exploration can be done on how the Fabric Block be used in a per formative manner or for industrial purposes.

Designer: Myung Duk Chung

Myung Duk Chung(South Korea) is visiting academics at C.A.S.T, University of Manitoba, teaching graduate students and researching new techniques of fabric form-work with earth materials, such as sand, gravel, and natural fibers. After he received Master degree in Architecture at MIT, his research includes the convergence of natural physics and digital simulation based on webGL.

Myung Duk Chung

CO-Living

2018 PANEL FINALISTS

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A new housing system that inspires people to CO-.

How to promote CO- in society? How to inspire interaction and collaboration? Designers Khoa Vu and Wilson Harkhono believe it should start small – starting from the basics of life; starting from the way we live. This project is a proposal for a new housing system that can inspire people to interact and collaborate more. This project was done as part of a design studio in Harvard Graduate School of Design in Spring 2017.

By pushing the boundaries of what separate homes can share with one another, we start to merge spaces as a large part of a collective living space. This arrangement will inspire people to socialize and interact more. CO-Living is a living situation where the distinction between solitary homes is blurred, promoting flows and collaboration. This basic idea is later carried out in several other scales – into cluster and urban scales. By transforming a typical cluster of housing into series of interweaving strips, we propose an indistinguishable living condition between public-private, inside-outside, and part-whole – producing a completely new way of living and interaction between people. This is a housing system that will encourage the idea of CO-, as the ultimate goal of Lexus Design Award 2018.

Designer: Khoa Vu and Wilson Harkhono

Khoa Vu(Vietnam) and Wilson Harkhono(Indonesia) first met at University of California, Berkeley where they both earned Bachelor of Art in Architecture with high honors. Their works attempt to push the boundary of conventional architecture. Both of them are currently pursuing Master of Architecture at Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

Khoa Vu and Wilson Harkhono

PAPER SKIN

2018 PANEL FINALISTS

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Connecting overlapping layers of paper to create a new material rich in color.

PAPER SKIN is a new structure using the very edge of paper as a surface. While being ‘just paper’, the structure acts and feels like the skin of a living being. The thin edge of one sheet of paper hardly registers in our consciousness, but even one piece has a thickness that carries color. This thickness increases by stacking several sheets of paper, and manifests as a color surface.

A thin piece of paper with a string threaded through tears easily, but arranging the paper with several layers and using precision laser cutting for string hole placement creates a strong uniform material. PAPER SKIN’s smooth undulating surface movement of the structure is from the perfect balance of size and thickness - small enough for fluid movement, but strong enough to resist tearing.

PAPER SKIN generates color waves due to the fluid movement of the edges of the paper. The color intensity can be adjusted by the tightness of the thread. Although PAPER SKIN appears as a sheet, but as it moves, the rippling form can be locked into shape. Potential applications range from small accessories to interior products.

Designer: Hiroki Furukawa

Hiroki Furukawa (Japan) graduated from Tama Art University Department of Product Design Course. After that, he has worked as an assistant at the same laboratory. He produces based on product design through material research.

Hiroki Furukawa

Gravity Pen

2018 PANEL FINALISTS

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A tool connecting virtual reality to physical experience, by simulating weight and touch.

In an increasingly reliant digital world, and many are frustrated with the need to focus in on two-dimensional screens. Virtual Reality can provide more lifelike, immersive experiences, but it still lacks a staple of the physical world - weight. The Gravity Pen connects the intuitive, tactile world with the limitless possibilities of the digital world.

With Gravity Pen, internal weights move to shift the center of gravity of the device, which creates convincing simulations for picking up objects, turning a screwdriver, carving and sculpting forms, and much more. If used for Computer Aided Design, it can reduce reliance on environmentally harmful prototyping materials, and help create products more grounded in reality. Designers often need precise dexterity, so it can be held like a pen. For activities like gaming, requiring a wide range of motion, buttons and a joystick, a handle can be attached.

Designer: Jon Simmons

Jon Simmons(USA) is an Industrial Designer striving to create intuitive, holistic solutions to complex problems. He is currently pursuing a Master's in Industrial Design at the California College of the Arts, and has an Engineering degree from Lafayette College.

Jon Simmons

COmer

2018 PANEL FINALISTS

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Set of clay containers that collaboratively accompany the process of cooking, eating and sharing bread.

Seeking to connect the present with the past and the essential with the conventional, Sistema Simple Studio designed an intangible experience built on one verb and two nouns: SHARING, through BREAD and SOIL, creating a bridge where nature's basic elements coexist: earth, water, air, fire and men.

This collective vision represents the concept behind 'COmer', a series of containers that trace and rescue the origins of eating, sharing and cooking. The studio designed three pots which accompany the bread-making process, made with clay from Pomaire: a rural town in Chile's central valley that treasures an ancient pottery tradition. The biggest pot is used to mix and knead the flower and water, while the smallest one is where the dough reacts by leavening. Then, by integrating the middle-sized container, all pots are combined to form an oven, where the bread is cooked over fire.

Bread and soil coexist in nature and society through the energy of our hands. 'COmer' designs an experience around bread-sharing, rescuing past and present values materialized through clay containers. Each with a unique function and a correlating one vis-á-vis the whole. Prefixed by CO, 'comer' means “to eat” in Spanish; the CO reminds us to always do it together.

Designer: Sistema Simple Studio

Kaleb Cardenas Zavala (Mexico), Lucas Margott aMeneses(Chile), Diego Gajardo Caldera (Chile), Carlos Sfeir Vottero(Chile), graduated from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. They met industrial designer Kaleb Cardenas(Mexico) from Tecnologico de Monterrey at Fab Lab Santiago, where they worked together and decided to combine their knowledge and passion for design to embark on new holistic projects.

Sistema Simple Studio

GRABBY

2018 PANEL FINALISTS

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A co-adapting cutting board for people with special needs.

Grabby is a special kitchen cutting board intended for people with special needs: those who cannot use their second hand and/or experience difficulties when cutting food. The board’s technology consists of a soft pillow covered with a kevlar fabric and an embedded vacuum pump. The pillow is filled with coffee grounds, which grabs and holds the item on the board thanks to the vacuum pump. It is possible to do things on this board with one hand, such as cutting vegetables and opening a jar. The silicone base of this board will prevent it from sliding on kitchen surfaces. The innovative approach to an ordinary thing will simplify the process of cooking particularly for people who suffered a stroke.

While researching this project in hospitals, many people with special needs as well as young parents were extremely interested. Hands are the most important tool for interaction with everyday objects.

Designer: I DEAL

Nadezhda Abdullina(Russia) and Marina Egorova(Russia) are both from Russia, St. Petersburg. Nadezhad graduated from ITMO University master degree in industrial design, innovation economics and Marina from St. Petersburg State Art and Industry Academy in industrial design, transportation design. They met in 2011 to work on the project Grabby.

I DEAL

Primavera

2018 PANEL FINALISTS

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To coalesce veneer and fabric laminated creates an unique armchair that stimulates imagination.

“Primavera” is a Graduation project at the Holon Institute of Technology. The “Primavera” armchair was initiated as a research project examining materials layering and their Combination. The research studied the relationships between materials of different properties Combined together into a new complete material/object. Yael Reboh sought to find out how each material keeps its unique identity while changing according to the material it interacts with, and by that creates a new object that appears and performs in a different way.

The new layered Combination created a new Design method allowing the thinking of the assembling of object components. The designer was fascinated by the aesthetic that the layered Combination created, the versatile expressions achieved from each material like soft vs. hard, cracking vs. incomplete, flexible vs. stable.

The armchair is made of lamination, combining layers of veneer and fabric. The lamination center begins with a wooden seat. From the firm wooden seat, the fabric is slowly combined ending with soft colorful tassels. Ending with the tassels, the arms create a new sensory experience. The backrest highlights the contrasts between the materials by the sharp connection. The combination of material creates together an interesting, vibrant and an avant-garde object. The name “Primavera” expresses the blooming of the colorful fabric between the wood layers.

Designer: Yael Reboh

Yael Reboh(Israel) is a graduate at the Holon Institute of Technology, Product Design program. The inspiration for her design is driven by her passion for different cultures and her love for materials. Yael lives and creates in Tel Aviv, Israel.

Yael Reboh

PIXEL

2017 GRAND PRIX WINNER

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A structure to experience the existence of Light YET Shadow.

In this world that we live in, everything is mirrored in our eyes with Light and Shadow.
A chandelier sparkling beautifully, mobile phones and cinema screens, morning sunlight pouring into a dark room, a child's smile reflecting the candles lit on a cake. Light and Shadow exist as contrasting elements that compose scenes of your daily life.
PIXEL is a device that lets you experience the existence of Light and Shadow with your full consciousness.
It uses a configuration of visors to create a range of Light and Shadow effects. Through repeated internal reflection, input images are averaged into square outputs. By converting Light and Shadow into a clear, sensible form, you can experience this beautiful fundamental phenomenon.
I have aimed to design between the Light and Shadow, believing that when designing the borderline between the two contrasting elements, they can resonate with each other to move the viewer. Through this, you will find that in fact the contrasts are intertwined with each other. Light and Shadow, inside and outside, one side and another _ this screen existing between these two contrasts can be a device for dividing, transforming and ‘connecting' at the same time.

Designer: Hiroto Yoshizoe

Hiroto Yoshizoe graduated from Musashino Art University. Currently based in Tokyo working on art direction and design as a spatial designer for commercial facilities. He focuses on interpreting the ideas of change, movement and time in space to create designs from both modern and analogue approaches.

Hiroto Yoshizoe

Mentor: Snarkitecture

In 2008 Daniel Arsham and Alex Mustonen founded Snarkitecture, a collaborative and experimental practice operating in territories between art and architecture. Sharing a mutual interest in the intersection of art and architecture since their student days together at Cooper Union in New York, their first commission was for Dior Homme. Deriving its name from Lewis Carroll's fanciful poem “The Hunting of the Snark”, Snarkitecture designs permanent, architectural scale projects and functional objects with new and imaginative purposes, creating moments of wonder and interaction that allow people to engage directly with the surrounding environment. Transforming the familiar into the extraordinary, Snarkitecture makes architecture perform the unexpected.
Snarkitecture

PLAYER'S PFLUTE

2017 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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Vegetable YET a Musical instrument provides fun and learning experience.

'PLAYER'S PFLUTE' helps every child explore music. It is a modular music toy system for a child to connect everyday objects using imaginative invention and musical creativity. By encouraging improvisation while playing, this toy helps a child experience music as a familiar and enjoyable activity. This creative musician kit consists of different mouthpieces, hole punchers and connectors. Simply by connecting them with various everyday objects, children can assemble their very own instruments and explore different musical tones. This design allows hundreds of different possibilities in music and instrument creation and enables children to learn music essentials while having fun, in a spirit of playful creativity.
PLAYER'S PFLUTE is a work of design as a catalyst for change. By creating a unique process for learning, PLAYER'S PFLUTE sheds light on how we might rethink and design a nurturing environment for every child and family.

Designer: Jia Wu

Jia Wu is a young industrial designer who specializes in creating new possibilities in interaction, products and infrastructures. Professionally trained by Design Product program at Royal College of Art in the U.K. and practicing design both in China and the UK, she is driven and passionate about using design as a catalyst for change and discovering the future.

Jia Wu

Mentor: Max Lamb

Max Lamb's work plays with the tradition of the working rural landscape — the beach as foundry, the quarry as workshop, felled yew trees of the Chatsworth estate as subject and source material. He is equally fascinated by the city, and his ability to adapt and respond to different environments produces designs that are uniquely of their time and place. Max is not committed to a single material or process, nor is he attracted to design as a means to solve problems. Rather he exploits the qualities inherent in a material to draw out its natural tendencies and beauty. His methods are high- and low-tech, and he is both designer and manufacturer, collaborating with foundries and factories as the scale or complexity of the project necessitates. However, there is continuity in the principles that he applies — honesty to material, a celebration of the process and of human capability, and its limitations.
Max Lamb

HAVING NOTHING, AND YET POSSESSING EVERYTHING

2017 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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A capsule for mobile living, Having nothing YET Everything.

What is the meaning of objects in our lives? The moving capsule enables simple and minimalist living through its mobility and functionality. (One object has more than one function; like a smart phone, the capsule goes beyond its function as just a container)

Designer: Ahran Won

Designer Ahran Won believes in the power of loving minds and the potential of design to be a positive element for our future. She is currently a studying landscape architecture at Harvard Graduate School of Design. She previously studied architecture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), and international law at Ewha Womans University.

Ahran Won

Mentor: Neri & Hu

Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu, cofounders of Neri & Hu Design and Research based in Shanghai, have been working on projects around the world which incorporate overlapping design disciplines to create a new paradigm in architecture. In 2014, Wallpaper*announced Neri & Hu as 2014 Designer of The Year. In 2013, they were inducted into theU.S. Interior Design Hall of Fame. Neri & Hu believes strongly that research is a key design tool as each projectbrings its own unique set of contextual issues. Providing architecture, interior, master planning, graphic and productdesign services, Neri & Hu recognizes that contemporary problems relating to buildings extend beyond theboundaries of traditional architecture. Rather than starting from a formulaic design, Neri & Hu's work is anchored inthe dynamic interaction of experience, detail, material, form and light.
Neri & Hu

STRUCTURAL COLOR - STATIC YET CHANGING

2017 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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A rug appears Static in design YET Changes with the needs of the user.

Static Yet Changing is a rug design that has the ability to physically and visually change with the needs of the user. The ever-changing function and aesthetics of the piece addresses the idea of the designing for longevity, creating products that evolve over the time.

Designer: Jessica Fügler

Jess Fügler is a graduate at the Royal College of Art's Design Products program. The inspiration for her design narratives are fueled by research on and curiosity about science and culture. Jess currently lives in New York and works as the Studio Director for Matter Made and the Co- founder of Other Kingdom.

Jessica Fügler

Mentor: Elena Manferdini

Elena Manferdini, founder and owner of Atelier Manferdini, with offices in Venice,California, has completed design, art and architectural projects in the United States, Europe and Asia including the Pavilion of the Museum of Contemporary Art in LosAngeles. Her firm has collaborated with internationally renowned companies such as Swarovski, and Sephora and her work has been featured in journals and publications including Elle, Vogue and the New York Times. Currently Graduate Chair at the Southern California Institute of Architecture she exhibits internationally and lectures widely having spoken at MIT, Princeton, Tsinghua University and Bauhaus. She was recently awarded the 2013 COLA Fellowship to support the production of original artwork. In 2011 she received a prestigious annual grant from United States Artists (USA) and her Blossom design for Alessi received the Good Design Award.
Elena Manferdini

BUOYANT MEASURING SPOON FOR THE BLIND

2017 PANEL FINALISTS

A measuring spoon with Unseen YET Visualized tactile graduations for the blind.

The sense of touch can be the eyes for blind people who can't read measurement scale markings. So for those people, I'd like to suggest a special measuring spoon which has tangible graduations. The buoyant measuring spoon has braille which lets blind people measure correctly by touching it.

Designer: Eunjin Park

Eunjin Park is a senior majoring in Industrial design at Dongseo University in Busan. She's interested in product design because it can offer convenience and inspiration to people.

Eunjin Park

THE LANDSCAPE OF PAPER

2017 PANEL FINALISTS

Disposable YET Upcycled material using traditional and modern technology.

When it comes to recyclable materials, people usually don't question their behavior of throwing things away. Consumers have a positive perception of "recycling" but lack consideration of the material's value, overlooking the root cause of the world's environmental crisis. Wasted paper interested me because paper is a large part of daily life and is overconsumed. I focused on upcycling paper to make it last longer, rather than recycling it. I also came across traditional Japanese KAKISHIBU paint made from persimmons. This natural coating makes paper waterproof, repels insects, has a shiny finish and is durable. I applied Kakishibu to wrinkled used paper, creating an effect similar to the traditional use on Japanese WASHI paper. Moreover, flattening the wrinkled paper revealed attractive patterns, despite wrinkles generally being considered a defect. Combining this traditional application with digital technology and laser cutting, I created a stronger 3D structure from delicate paper by making slits to minimize waste. By harmonizing opposites, I turned waste into a precious material. Applying traditional craft technique and merging digital technology, I discovered a new application for paper.

Designer: Kuniko Maeda

Kuniko Maeda studied traditional wood carving in Kyoto. Her main interests are material lifecycles and sustainability. BA and MA in textile design at Chelsea College of Arts, continued studies in material lifecycles through textile design.

Kuniko Maeda

MASS PRODUCTION TO UNIQUE ITEMS

2017 PANEL FINALISTS

Mass produced YET One-of-a-kind ceramics created using a portable kiln.

In Japan alone, 58,344,424kg of ceramics are made yearly, and even more are produced worldwide. Most of these mass produced ceramics are destroyed without even being used. Our device is a kiln which enables mass produced ceramics which have been destroyed or unused to form a new unique 'one-of-a- kind' item. The kiln is portable and can be used by anyone under the guidance of a skilled potter. The kiln can be used for 2 to 3 hours when fueled with charcoal or wood. Over the temperature of 1300℃, the charcoal and wood begin to melt, settling on the ceramics to create a new design through the power of nature. There is a new value to the item unique to the individual who has made it. These ceramics, which had been mass produced and discarded, can be reborn by re-firing them. Mass production and one-of-a- kind items are contradictory things. However, this kiln bridges the gap. This kiln has been made by many pottery beginners. An experimental event has also been held.

Designer: Takehana Yoshifumi,Bungo Okuda,Akira Okuda

Takehana Yoshifumi is an architect and designer based in Tokyo. Bungorogama is Shigaraki pottery that originated in Shiga where Bungo Okuda and Akira Okuda are based. All three work together under the group name “TAKEHANAKE-Bungorogama”.

Takehana Yoshifumi,Bungo Okuda,Akira Okuda

PAPER KETTLE

2017 PANEL FINALISTS

Combustible YET Fire-Resistant PAPER KETTLE.

Paper and fire are two opposite substances and cannot coexist. However, through research I have discovered a cooking pot made of paper used in Japan from around 1732. This pot is made entirely of paper and is used for cooking. This is possible because paper‘s combustion temperature is generally around 300 , which is higher than water's boiling point of 100 . Thus paper containing water does not burn. I realized that paper is flexible and light, yet can also be used to boil water, making it ideal for outdoor applications. For these reasons I decided to construct the lightest kettle in the world. I made several designs and selected the best one, then made a variety of models all of which were made of only paper. I continued to add and subtract pieces to polish the form and function, succeeding to make it not only functional but also beautiful in design. PAPER KETTLE can be produced at a low cost, making it affordable. PAPER KETTLE will be ideal for camping or hiking. After use the kettle can be put in the fire to burn, leaving no trash behind.

Designer: Ryo Katayama

Ryo Katayama specialized in product design at Tama Art University. He is interested in keeping alive traditional Japanese manufacturing techniques, characterized by subtle and sensitive artisanship. He has won the Wemake Kobayashi Medicine Company design competition.

Ryo Katayama

PLATANACEAE

2017 PANEL FINALISTS

Banana leaf bandages that out performs Synthetic YET are Biodegradable and soothing.

PLATANACEAE is a series of first-aid bandages for burn wounds that occur in the home environment. They are designed to fit different parts of the arm, wrist, palm, and fingers: common places for domestic burns. The hydrated texture of banana leaves is refreshing when in contact with burned or scalded skin. The bandages' shapes allow them to wrap around different parts of the hands and arms without direct contact between skin and any adhesives. Burn bandages are ordinarily replaced within 24 hours. After this time, a banana-leaf bandage would naturally peel away from the skin on its own. The banana leaf is an abundant resource in tropical areas of our planet. While researching applications of banana leaves, I came across the use of this material as a wound dressing for burn patients. Studies show that the effectiveness of banana- leaf bandages is equal or better than synthetic bandages. This proposal has been developed by researching and analyzing the needs of the user (medical, ergonomic) and the properties of the banana leaf material (fabrication and conservation).

Designer: Paula Cermeño

Paula Cerme ño is a product designer who enjoys exploring the potential of plants and how they can improve people's wellbeing. She is studying in the Product Design Master at ECAL University of Art and Design of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Paula Cermeño

POD: HOMELESS YET HOME

2017 PANEL FINALISTS

Temporary shelter for displaced populations. Homeless YET Home.

POD is a modular, medium-term housing solution for displaced populations. It can be deployed quickly to locations around the world. Once delivered, the pre-assembled PODs are easily erected by the local people. The shared experience of working together to erect PODs, will help foster a sense of community among fellow inhabitants during these often precarious times.
Designed as a series of telescoping square frames, the POD can create both a larger area to accommodate groups and a smaller area for sleeping. Inhabitants are protected from the elements by a durable fabric skin which is integrated with the structural metal frame. In order to increase the adaptability and durability of the POD module, structural support footings raise the POD off the ground, minimizing physical impact on the site while providing greater stability and security in various environments.
The assembled POD modules can then be connected and arranged in a wide range of formations creating new communities of a more familiar urbanism for the inhabitants. This flexibility restores to individuals a sense of basic human dignity and feeling of respect for human basic rights, which are often treated as an afterthought when dealing with those in displacement crises.

Designer: Eric Schwartzbach,Benjamin Ward

Benjamin Ward and Eric Schwartzbach began working together as MODlab in 2016 with a focus on architecture, urbanism, and interdisciplinary design.

Eric Schwartzbach,Benjamin Ward

RETROSPECTION PROJECT / TIME TUNE RADIO

2017 PANEL FINALISTS

Hi-tech YET Retro radio tunes in programs from past and present.

This innovative radio shows how our material culture's desire for “efficiency” can be balanced with the lost values of “taking time” and preservation. It provides three forgotten characteristics of tools from the past: enjoyable effort, positive feel, and ergonomic analog operation. The form is evocative of early wireless receivers that required patient fiddling with dials and antennas.
This retrospective radio enables users to listen to any radio program from the past to the present. The tuning dial is linked to archived programs stocked on the Internet. Generally speaking, the limited nature of radio transmission encourages imagination and communication more than TV or other media that provide more packaged information.
Early radios brought users the miracle of encountering faraway people. After the Japan earthquake and tsunami of 2011, radios became the most convenient tools for disaster victims to access information.
Retrospective and technological aspects of this radio bring back times from the past, while serving as a model for tomorrow.
Radios transmit only sounds and words, but for this very reason they engage our imagination and engender a sense of time. This radio, enhanced with technology, allows access to not only history but also our ancestors' life stories and values.

Designer: Takuro Sanda

Takuro Sanda graduated from Tama Art University product design department in 2016. As a Tokyo-based product designer, his work is solely rooted in his insights into nature and the potential of things. His projects focus on how obsolete technologies and tools may help illustrate the possibilities of future when attention is given to their forms and functionalities.

Takuro Sanda

TRAFFIC LIGHT SYSTEM

2017 PANEL FINALISTS

Simple YET Sophisticated traffic light.

Despite the rapid speed of innovation today, a product as important as the traffic light has hardly changed in more than a century. I questioned whether there wasn't room for improvement. During this project I realized how intricate, complex and nontrivial it is. The concept of the traffic light has become fixed in people's minds. My main task for this project was to rethink its interaction with people. At first glance it has a simple form YET is actually complicated in function. In the traffic light's lack of innovation in design, I saw the opportunity to make a successful product. The formula would be to achieve harmony between function and aesthetics by implementing a simple yet elegantly modern system. It would improve quality of life in terms of better safety, a friendlier driving experience and improved view of the cityscape. The result is a simple solution YET complicated in the interplay of details and the potential scenarios for interaction.

Designer: Evgeny Arinin

Evgeny Arinin is an Industrial Designer from Moscow, Russia. Graduated from British Higher School of Art and Design in Moscow in 2014. For the last two years, was involved with transport and urban infrastructure working on Moscow Metro, Department of Transport of Moscow and British Design firm - Billings Jackson Design.

Evgeny Arinin

AGAR PLASTICITY - A POTENTIAL USEFULNESS OF AGAR FOR PACKAGING AND MORE

2016 GRAND PRIX WINNER

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AGAR PLASTICITY is a project exploring how agar, a gelatinous material obtained from marine algae, can be used as an environmentally friendly packaging material alternative to plastic.

"Seaweed-derived agar is traditionally consumed as food in Japan, and used in scientific and medical fields worldwide. Sold in a dry state, agar shows porous, feathery structure and is very light despite its volume. We have taken notice of these features and have been exploring its possibility as packaging material. Goods are usually shipped wrapped in plastic materials. Once unwrapped, they soon become waste or are collected to be recycled. Considering the raw materials and energy for processing, this situation is undesirable. Anticipating effective and sustainable utilization of natural resources has become more and more indispensable. Believing biodegradable substitutes to plastics are needed, we took this opportunity to tackle this seemingly ignored problem. Agar can be extracted by boiling specific kinds of red algae and then dehydrating the soup. Its resultant state depends on the ways of dehydration, and the types of red algae. For a soft cushioning structure, it's frozen, for stiff film-like state, it's compressed. Because agar is also moldable, it was proposed not only as a cushioning material, but also as packaging material. We have also explored the possibility of an agar-derived plastic material. After use, agar products can be disposed of in an environmentally-friendly way. It can serve as a material to improve the water-retention property of soil, and should it drift in the sea, it would not harm marine lives."

Designer: Kosuke Araki,Noriaki Maetani,Akira Muraoka

AMAM is a design group formed in 2015 by Kosuke Araki, Noriaki Maetani and Akira Muraoka who studied at Product Design Department, Tama Art University during same period. Also, Araki (Design Products) and Maetani (Innovation Design Engineering) have acquired MA at Royal College of Art in the same year.

Kosuke Araki,Noriaki Maetani,Akira Muraoka

Mentor: Max Lamb

"My first impression of them (AMAM) was that they know what they are talking about! They are well researched in the subject of agar. This is a very interesting idea, and they are obliviously very observant, very aware and very curious designers."

Max Lamb

DADA

2016 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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DADA is a block toy which can be freely combined using bands, holes, and pegs to stimulate each child's imagination.

"Children have wild imagination, so every child has their own unique world. They tell their stories with passion. Toys are products they can use to express their world. But existing toy blocks have fixed forms and standardized connecting structures. They limit children's imagination. What if children could make toy creatures using various blocks that correspond to their anticipation? They would create works that reflect their inner self using unique colors and shapes. DADA blocks develop children's sensibility. Familiar objects can be connected through banding, putting in the holes, allowing children to create whatever they want and choose their own combination methods. A roll-up bag makes it easy for them to bring the blocks outside. They can simply unfold the bag to play. DADA is a simple block kit. But it can be turned into various forms with the children's anticipation. Children choose various blocks to create various objects. The blocks can also help them anticipate the future."

Designer: Myungsik Jang

Designer Myungsik Jang pursues natural shapes and flexible views. He is inspired from things surrounding him like nature and animals. He wants to tell stories through his work involving vitality. His work is based on craft and bricolage designs.

Myungsik Jang

Mentor: Neri & Hu

"We expect this mentorship and collaboration to be quite remarkable. We want to make sure that the final product in Milan is something we would be proud of, he would be proud of and Lexus would be proud of. The most important thing is that, we are hoping what started as a very simple idea will surprise and maybe provoke people in Milan."

Neri & Hu

Shape Shifters

2016 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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Shape Shifters is a special cut of garment, applying modular principles to textiles, which allows creating different outfits.

"Currently, fashion houses showcase four to six collections annually, with various offerings throughout each collection displaying redundancy in fabrication and silhouette, led me to question how to innovate within this realm; anticipating development of intelligent and adaptable construction that embeds shape change. Building upon my MA in Material Futures from Central Saint Martins, as a platform for exploration, Shape Shifters displays how modular principles can create dynamic garments with embedded silhouette versatility. Specifically, focus is placed on the linking of modular components via hinge-based systems. This provides the wearer freedom to configure the garment's silhouette based on style preference. I believe this will enrich people's lives by providing an adaptable garment that will serve a variety of purposes; minimizing consumption whilst maximizing individuality. Specifically, the garment system evokes a sense of play, while offering active participation in design and encouraging positive self-image. My technical background in Fashion Design [B. Des (Hons) from Ryerson University [Canada]]. Throughout the research and development of the project, traditional construction techniques were utilized via industrial machinery. Adobe platforms were explored to develop laser cut files for initial prototypes. Sampling also included the use of Stratasys PolyJet 3D printing technology, where multi-materials of various rigidities were utilized to test if the textile could be printed in one process and remove the assembly component of the procedure. The project's main discovery was that 3d printing technology is not a suitable replacement for the ‘textile,' as friction at hinge points impaired movability in even the most flexible 3d print materials available today. This discovery led me back to more traditional methods for the full-scale initial prototypes, where the intersection of natural and man-made materials, followed by passive hinge systems allowed for silhouette variability and comfort on the body."

Designer: Angelene Laura Fenuta

Angelene Laura Fenuta, founded ANGEL_NE in 2015, during her Masters in Material Futures at Central Saint Martins. Her practice interrogates fashion, while attempting to discover a more 'sustainable' option. ANGEL_NE builds upon core female wardrove components, while being inspired by architectural construction and 18th century aristocratic dress. Her work has since been featured in FRAME magazine.

Angelene Laura Fenuta

Mentor: Elena Manferdini

"As a mentee she seemed to have the will to challenge her own limitation. My selection was not dictated only by my interest in her project but much more about her personality and her dedication to her work, which seemed to be a winning combination to make something extraordinary."

Elena Manferdini

TRACE

2016 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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Trace is a clock that uses a liquid with UV rays and discoloration properties, allowing us to visualize the passing time.

"Anticipation is about our expectation of the future. Every second that passes is an opportunity to affect this path before us, yet in this fast paced society, how many of us take action? When we considered the theme of anticipation, we were naturally drawn to the concept of time. ‘Trace' is a clock that uses UV light to invoke a color change within a transparent photochromic solution. Every second, minute and hour is marked by a UV light beam that rotates around the face of the clock. This UV light triggers the photochromic change, leaving a trace of color as time sweeps by. This solution fades back to transparent after around 60 seconds, leaving a trail that completely erases itself. 'Trace' is about visualizing the present moment. There is anticipation in the color change of the liquid, and anticipation in how it fades away. And if the future is based on our past, our anticipation for change should drive us to action in the present. ‘Trace' is a reminder that in order to create the future that we anticipate, we must act towards it."

Designer: Begum Ayaskan,Bike Ayaskan

Begum and Bike Ayaskan are a twin designer duo based in London with a passion to explore the relation between nature, humans, and objects. Their vision is to bring people closer to nature and nature closer to design, and to create dynamic pieces that change and evolve with time.

Begum Ayaskan,Bike Ayaskan

Mentor: Snarkitecture

"We were drawn to the simplicity of STUDIO AYASKAN's work, and we saw the amount of potential in this project."

"We were impressed by the clarity of their concept and level of preparation, especially in terms of advancing the prototype. Hopefully, we can contribute to that process and later offer guidance as the studio grows."

Snarkitecture

PLANTS-SKIN

2016 PANEL FINALISTS

PLANTS-SKIN is a planter made of a colored mortar and special ink that visualizes the timing for watering plants.

"How do people anticipate things? One day, I realized that I am naturally 'anticipating' when I grow plants. Plants need water and I was anticipating the timing at which I should water them depending on how moist soil was. With a focus on this behavior, I tried to propose a new relationship between humans and plants by designing a planter that plants would absolutely need. With this planter, people can actually see if the plants need water. PLANTS-SKIN was created using a moderately permeable planter made from a colored mortar. This was then coated with hydro-chromic ink. When the surface absorbs water, the white ink becomes transparent and colors appear. The levels of dryness and moisture are represented as beautiful color gradations on the surface of the planter. It's almost like listening to them breathe. Through this interaction, we realize we unconsciously anticipate and make decisions. If it's windy outside and have an umbrella, we realize we might need rain boots. This behavior is not triggered by something obvious like the weather forecast but comes from natural human behavior requiring some creativity. Watering plants is something people have been doing for a long time. However, looking at traces of the past is necessary to anticipate the future. Perhaps looking back is what makes this ability possible."

Designer: Hiroto Yoshizoe

Hiroto is a Spatial Designer based in Tokyo, Japan, working on Art Direction and Design for commercial spaces. His focus is the ideas of 'changes', 'movements' and 'time' in the space to create aesthetic designs from both modern and the analog approaches.

Hiroto Yoshizoe

Project Play

2016 PANEL FINALISTS

Project Play is a first-of-its-kind lamp powered by wireless technology and realized through the creation of magnetic rubber.

"Project Play is composed of a series of table lamps, with each object made by a standalone machine. Aiming to create new value between object and user, honest focus and magnification is put on the manufacturing process. Geometrically simple but materially complex; their value aims to be enhanced through long term interaction with carefully select and playful material properties. 'In anticipation of technology to come'. The head of the lamp, where the light source is contained, is wirelessly powered via resonant inductive coupling, a technology not yet widely implemented. A journey into material experimentation drove the direction of the project.
Throughout the design process, a multitude of materials and techniques were tested with focus on the creation of something new; ending in the creation of a magnetic rubber. Founded through a blend of ferrous powder and silicone, the magnetic material forms the body of the lamps. With a magnet encased inside the head of the lamp, it is then to able to be positioned freely around the body, benefitting an engagement of playful interaction between user and object. The wireless power allows the light to be on whilst it is magnetically attached to the body, and off when not attached."

Designer: Oliver Staiano

Oliver Staiano is a London based designer. With unwavering passion for materiality, Staiano employs an explorative and experimental approach to materials alongside meticulous thought in order to bring a joyful innovation into the objects he creates.

Oliver Staiano

aniknown

2016 PANEL FINALISTS

aniknown is a creation of clothes for six types of animal, choosing the materials according to each one's features, behaviour and habitat.

"Clothes for animals designed according to their habitats and behavior. Materials were chosen according to the animals' features, behavior and habitat to create six types of clothes for animals. For example, I used linen which breathes well and wicks away moisture for Asian elephants because they are sensitive to heat. They also have sensitive skin so I used vegetable dyes that repel insects. For mountain gorillas which live in high-altitude forests, I designed a lined coat to keep them warm. It's also a bolero coat that's open in the chest area so that they can easily beat their chest. For sloths that are preyed upon by eagles known for their excellent eye sight, I used batik so that they can camouflage themselves. When we say “clothes” we think of T-shirts and jeans. In other words, when we see these, we automatically know they're clothes. However, what about this work? It's make from fabric, there are sleeves, it's symmetrical so it has all the elements that tell us it's a piece of clothing. However, from its size and shape, it's not the usual piece of clothing. If the clothing is this big, how big is the body? How long is the neck? How are the feet? I want people to have fun imagining what kind of animal each clothing belongs too, as if they discover the bones of an unknown animal. They can anticipate the type of animal through the work."

Designer: Ayami Marugata

After graduating from Tokyo University of the Arts, Department of Design, is currently studying mainly product design at the same university.

Ayami Marugata

Bio-Vide

2016 PANEL FINALISTS

Bio-Vide is a product, such as tables or envelopes, designed using fallen leaves. It is a visualization of the concept that all things return to earth.

"There should be a close connection between each process but we don't see it. In modern society, everything is systematically divided, causing us to not see things as being part of a whole. With large quantities of single products, we just assume there is a “next” step. However, we don't think about where things come from, how they are processed and what happens after we throw them away. There is a sense of transience and feeling of sadness when things reach an end. I feel there is something important there that cannot be expressed in words, so I've decided to express it through my work “Bio-Vide.” I designed an envelope where the part we tear is made of fallen leaves. This is an envelope that allows people to actually feel the end of a thing when performing the action of tearing. By incorporating a natural material into a standardized envelope, I was able to add feelings into an ordinary activity. I combined fallen leaves and resin through hot-press. For the fallen leaves' board, I think people can visually understand the concept that, although not as strong as plywood, it will eventually return to the earth. The fallen leaves are composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose polysaccharide, lignin, resin, and carbonyl, which are similar to elements found in wood. Even for plywood, people used to use hide glue to stick things together. In terms of returning to earth, if we look further into resin, we discover lignin-based adhesive resin and polylactic resin. I think we can used these to create even more environmentally friendly materials."

Designer: Takuma Yamazaki

After graduating from Tama Art University in 2015, joined Canon as a product designer. Always enjoyed new discoveries in Hokkaido's nature ever since childhood. Father was a veterinarian in a livestock hygiene service center, and so grew up watching treatments of livestock. Spends days thinking about the distance between man and creatures.

Takuma Yamazaki

Hexagon

2016 PANEL FINALISTS

Hexagon is an umbrella that uses magnets to connect to other umbrellas, encouraging interaction between people.

"When it rains, the world feels smaller. People walking in the city pass by each other and hide themselves under their umbrella. Umbrellas have existed for 3500 years. Since its invention it has been used as a tool to protect. People use umbrellas to protect themselves in the dark wet world and seem to be used to shut themselves off from the outside. So in this project, I tried to redesign the umbrella and create a design that can promotes interaction between passersby. Hexagon is not just an umbrella, it is a method to facilitate communication, a way to break through traditional boundary. It is a media for people to anticipate the future. With the special magnetic structure, Hexagon can be connected with each other. Whether they are introverts or extroverts, people can feel the subtle magnetic force that exists between them and have the feeling they are still part of this world. Rain makes the world lonely, but what I hope people can feel that even though they are alone, they are not lonely. I also hope this design gives them a sense of warmth and anticipation."

Designer: Chulin Yang

With the background of Industrial Design at Wuhan University, she is specialized in interaction design at Monash University. Continues her studies. Relies on inspiration to create designs that bring people together.

Chulin Yang

RESOLUTION OF SOUND LOCATION

2016 PANEL FINALISTS

RESOLUTION OF SOUND LOCATION is a headphone device composed of super directive microphones and speakers that can determine the sound source and adjust volume.

"Owls have an excellent sense of hearing. They can tell where a sound is coming from by the position difference between their left and right ears, and pick up faint sounds by adjusting the depressions of their face panel shaped like a parabola. The main purpose of this work was to mimic the features of owls, explore new possibilities regarding the future of hearing aid expansion devices. What if we could identify the sound source just as well as owls? We could improve our ability to search for survivors at disaster sites. Sound signals such as voice and breath are important signs during a search. If the device is able to determine the exact position of a sound source, it would be tremendously useful to discover survivors. Such a device would also greatly prevent traffic accidents. High levels of sound source localization for electric vehicles and bicycles should significantly decrease accident risks. Our work is composed of several pairs of microphones and speakers facing different directions. The concept is ""resolution of sound location.” Each pair, or unit, can increase the volume of a sound from a particular direction. It can also sense specific sounds by attaching an extra sound filter unit. Through unit adjustments such as improving the sound resolution from a specific direction or choosing which sounds to pick up, we will explore the future of hearing."

Designer: Takato Sasaki,Yuki Shinohara

Takato Sasaki has been working in the field of design and illustration. He actively uses his knowledge and skills in his designs. Yuki Shinohara works mainly in product design. He uses his versatile knowledge and proposes things and matters that bring innovative value to the world.

Takato Sasaki,Yuki Shinohara

Drop Box

2016 PANEL FINALISTS

Drop Box utilizes aerodynamics to allow critical supplies to be airdropped safely in disaster areas without requiring a parachute.

"Drop Box is a new way to deliver supplies in times of disaster that uses the principle of aerodynamics. Disaster areas often receive the supplies by air drop , but the traditional way of using parachutes requires a lot of effort and are unsafe. The idea of “Drop Box" comes from a childhood toy (something resembling the Japanese "taketombo") that uses simple aerodynamics so it can do a vertical rotation fall, and the bottom of the cone can absorb the impact force upon landing. According to aerodynamics, the “Drop Box” will start revolving after being released,the three propellers will produce upward resistance, while the conical bottom of the box will soften the impact of landing. Compared to the use of a parachute drop, it will save a lot money and manpower. At the same time, the entire box is made of the corrugated paper to make it completely recyclable and less costly. Therefore, the use of the "Drop Box" is less costly and safer."

Designer: Ding Dong,Jincai Ma,Peter Luo,Huang Junxi

Design team consisting of 4 students studying at the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts. They work based on the concept that the ideas of a design come from life and designs give back to life. They propose designs that bring warmth to our lives like a gentle kiss.

Ding Dong,Jincai Ma,Peter Luo,Huang Junxi

Slow Door

2016 PANEL FINALISTS

Slow Door is conceived as an assembly of cubic components forming a spatial mechanism that delays the transition through a doorway. It allows us to appreciate the time and space created by the experience.

"Slow Door is a slow motion door designed to actually "feel" space. The slow door was designed to investigate the in-between space - "The space of anticipation". We wanted to design an event that would orchestrate the experience through the threshold as a space in itself. This was manifested by delaying the transition through the doorway and by prolonging the moment of haptic interface between the subject and the object. The challenge during the design process was to ascertain the degree of intervention pivotal to making it experiential while still maintaining its functionality. The slow door consists of 252 Cubic units of which 251 are typical with dimensions of 100mmX100mmX100mm and one atypical block which has an integrated door handle. The units are distributed over a grid of 21 rows and 12 columns."

Designer: Deepak Jawahar,Irina Michaela Bogdan

Deepak Jawahar and Irina Bogdan are both designers with an architectural background. Their works address different scales and are informed by their interests in philosophy and computational design.

Deepak Jawahar,Irina Michaela Bogdan

Sense-Wear

2015 GRAND PRIX WINNER

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Sense-Wear is a collection of clothes and accessories that emphasize the use of senses. Their primary purpose is to stimulate and improve awareness of our senses, while training us to better use them all. Some Sense-Wear items are designed to mute physical sensations, some to sharpen them.
Squeeze-me is a multi-purpose scarf for use in an emotional emergency. Normally worn around the head, its elastic material makes it stretchable around the body to generate a deep pressure that can calm the wearer like a warm hug.
Shake-me is a necklace for tasting, touching and shaking. Several extensions provide different textures and flavours. It recalls multi-sensory kids' toys in that it can be used to train in discerning different tastes and different tactile experiences, (ideally with the eyes closed).
The Pump-me jacket incorporates an inflatable device to buffer the wearer against unwanted external sensations and create a contact-free personal space.
Pull-me is an aromatic scarf, effectively a portable collection of familiar scents and fragrances that is used to conjure up pleasant moments and comfortable sensations. Its several retractable extensions can be loaded with scents, specimens, or small objects.
Hold-me is a hoodie poncho that makes sounds, helping to focalize the wearer's auditory capabilities. It is covered with musical flakes that emit sound in response to movements, while two built-in super ears help the wearer listen to these new, unexpected sounds.

Designer: Emanuela Corti and Ivan Parati

Dubai-based designers Emanuela Corti and Ivan Parati co-founded Caravan, a design collective that is active in several creative fields. They share an interest in cultural, material and social aspects of a globalized community. Blending digital-fabrication and artisanal competence Caravan's projects aims at creating awareness of heritage to address contemporary challenges.

Emanuela Corti and Ivan Parati

Mentor: Robin Hunicke

Robin Hunicke is a game designer and producer, with a background in fine art, computer science and applied game studies. Her titles include the award-winning PSN downloadable title, Journey, Steven Spielberg's Boom Blox series for the Nintendo Wii, MySims, and The Sims2. In the fall of 2012, she co-founded Funomena, an independent game development studio in San Francisco. Recognized as an influential Woman in Games, Robin is an evangelist for diversity of thought and participation in game design and game culture. She promotes the MDA approach to game design, co-organizes the annual Experimental Gameplay Workshop, has chaired the IndieCade Festival of independent games.

Robin Hunicke

Diomedeidae

2015 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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Humans subconsciously sense more details than we may think they do. Diomedeidae is an interactive art piece that allows us to access a place where the conscious mind seldom focuses.
As a kinetic lighting sculpture, Diomedeidae generates electricity from its own flapping movement, which is triggered by pulling down and releasing the weight located in the middle of two strips of wooden bars. The brightness of the LEDs connected to the piezoelectric elements is attenuated according to the damped vibration.
Humans are very sensitive to movement associated with the existence of life, as such sensitivity has been crucial for our survival. Diomedeidae is like a bird flapping its wings, a jellyfish gently glowing in the sea, or a firefly flickering for a brief moment. The oscillation and the lighting directly visualize the energy changes, appealing to human senses through their subtle fluctuations. Rewarding users for giving it life, Diomedeidae offers them an experience whereby they can enjoy light and motion.

Designer: Daiki Nakamori,Adriano Alfaro,Gaetano Mirko Vatiero

A group of three designers based in Kyoto and Milan.
Coming together in Milan, they design from a cross-cultural perspective.

Daiki Nakamori,Adriano Alfaro,Gaetano Mirko Vatiero

Mentor: Arthur Huang

Educated in Cornell University's B-ARCH and Harvard's Graduate M-Arch II programs, Huang developed a multi-disciplinary maker-doer ethos at a young age inspired by history, structural engineering and biology. With no industry precedents in sight, he decided to start a company to pioneer the transformation of universally accepted carbon minimizing concepts into physical products/materials. Huang established MINIWIZ in 2005 in New York and in 2006 in Hong Kong. Since then, the company has grown into an international eco-material, building-module and design company.

Arthur Huang

LUZ

2015 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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Global emotional lighting based on open source technology and programming, Luz is a lighting concept designed to help people in the Polar Regions who are physically and psychologically affected by lack of sunshine or daylight. This broad-shaped, round and sensitive lamp molds into different natural shapes and reacts to various weather conditions.
The main structure of LUZ connects two RGB LED stripes to an Open Source micro-controller and a TCS sensor which captures the color temperature (K) and light intensity (lux) values of the external environment. This electronic system is programmed to gradually modify the direction of the glow (internal or external) and the light-color sensibility of the lamp depending on weather conditions. If it is cloudy, the color of the luminaire stimulates brain reactions; if it is snowing, LUZ emits enthusiastic and optimistic light; and, at night, it communicates sensations of imagination and relaxation. When switched off, the device elegantly blends into a white wall.

IDEAL VESSEL FOR EMOTIONS
"One of my aims is to express the values of the senses through design. That is why the circle, as the most natural and simplest form that a human brain understands, or as the symbol of movement without beginning or end, is the ultimate shape for LUZ, the ideal vessel for emotions."
A new Internet platform for uploading the final IDE programming code will be created so that ‘LUZ' users worldwide can share their emotional responses to light and chromatics.

Designer: Marina Mellado Mendieta

Marina Mellado Mendieta, Spanish graduate, product designer and CSM-London master's program student, focuses her work on improving common aspects of everyday life. She combines design and technology to realize perfect balance through clever and dynamic solutions.

Marina Mellado Mendieta

Mentor: Max Lamb

A modern day craftsman, Max Lamb is a furniture designer whose design sensibility is informed by his extensive knowledge of manufacturing techniques, respect for materials, and skill as a maker. A native of Cornwall, Max has been tinkering with objects and engaging with the physical landscape since he was a small boy, a curiosity that led to an MA in Design Products at the Royal College and subsequently the foundation of his workshop-based design practice. Max explores both traditional and unconventional materials and processes, blending experimentation and rationale to create furniture and products that are both honest and intelligible. Max teaches Design Products at the Royal College of Art and runs regular design workshops for companies and institutions around the world.

Max Lamb

ANIMAL MASKS

2015 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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“SENSES” are the most fundamental faculties possessed by animals. But, in today's information societies, people dwell in concrete jungles, in air-conditioned rooms, and acquire information and converse with friends via the Internet. With technologies having become the “black box,” people tend to feel that their senses are limited and limiting. They seek to regain their natural senses by jogging in the morning, keeping a dog, nurturing plants, and escaping to the wilderness in the holidays.
It is well known that, in certain mythologies there are deities with animals'heads and human bodies. And, in numerous traditional festivals and ceremonies, celebrants don animal masks in an attempt to assume the capabilities of such animals by mimicking their features. But those masks are only symbols. They only confer symbolic capabilities. Of course, people cannot really acquire those capabilities.
ANIMAL MASKS offer wearers the opportunity to see the world as animals do. For example, the giraffe mask will provide the loftier, wider-ranging point of view that is symbolically associated with giraffes. To realize this functionality, the masks contain certain digital devices.
The purpose of this work is to fuse mythological symbolism with contemporary reality by connecting the symbols and the technology in a form of bricolage.

Designer: Keita Ebidzuka

Keita Ebidzuka graduated in architecture from Kyoto University and completed a master's degree at Tokyo University of the Arts. He was also an exchange student at Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
Currently, he is a researcher in the Kitagawara Laboratory at Tokyo University of the Arts.

Keita Ebidzuka

Mentor: Neri & Hu

Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu, cofounders of Neri & Hu Design and Research based in Shanghai, have been working on projects around the world which incorporate overlapping design disciplines to create a new paradigm in architecture. In 2014, Wallpaper* announced Neri & Hu as 2014 Designer of The Year. In 2013, they were inducted into the U.S. Interior Design Hall of Fame. Neri & Hu believes strongly that research is a key design tool as each project brings its own unique set of contextual issues. Providing architecture, interior, master planning, graphic and product design services, Neri & Hu recognizes that contemporary problems relating to buildings extend beyond the boundaries of traditional architecture. Rather than starting from a formulaic design, Neri & Hu's work is anchored in the dynamic interaction of experience, detail, material, form and light.

Neri & Hu

Leather?

2015 PANEL FINALISTS

"Huh?" That is how people react to products made from materials whose texture they don't recognize; the result is surprise and sensation. While "being easy-to-understand" clearly works on people's intuition, "wonder" also has its place. When thinking about material, one automatically combines its tactile properties and the shape of the object. These cannot be separated as our expectation of how the material will feel flows from the shape, and vice versa. But, how does the brain react if the shape is totally different from what one imagined? "Huh?" is how our five senses would respond.

Leather?

Three-dimensional objects can be formed by processing leather waste powder using washi-producing and pulp-moulding techniques. One of the processes in shoemaking is edge-grinding of leather. The ground leather waste becomes a powder containing a considerable quantity of short fibres. This designer combines leather waste powder, starch glue (sometimes) and water to create solid objects. He is currently conducting research on improving the strength of the compound and the processing method.

Designer: Amon Matsuo

Born in 1991, in Yokohama, Japan, Amon Matsuo graduated from Tama Art University, Department of Product Design in 2014 and currently works for Mizuno Corporation as a designer of sports equipment.

Amon Matsuo

yamaori taniori tent

2015 PANEL FINALISTS

The purpose of this tent is to ”relax and revive the senses”. Visitors to this tent will be invited to relax in a cozy atmosphere that delivers a nostalgic feeling and a sense of security. Through the act of creating the tent, and from the sound and smell of the paper, adults will find themselves recalling their childhood days. The tent will also revive one's aesthetic sense. Origami is a traditional art form with which all Japanese are familiar. It is a common form of children's play, usually taught by parents and friends. Repetition of the delicate folding patterns creates countless unique shapes. This tent concept was inspired by Origami. The visual surprise when a plain sheet of paper becomes a three-dimensional form through simple manipulation, the tactile sense of folding the paper, the smell and sound experienced inside the erected tent _ all of these play upon the typical Japanese person's senses.
The other reason for creating this tent was the designer's reaction to TV news coverage of the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 2011, showing the distress and uncertainty of people in the shelters. She was struck by the ”cardboard walls” dividing the temporary shelter space to provide evacuees with some privacy protection.
It occurred to her that by adding one simple action, the cardboard could be turned into a tent that would brighten people's hearts. Hence, the Origami-inspired tent construction. She hoped to help people get through the crisis with design that was intrinsic to Japanese senses.

Designer: Iyo Hasegawa

Iyo Hasegawa is an artist who works in the fields of interior design and installation and is inspired by both unseen and apparent aspects of people. She creates products that express human nature as observed in those internal and external human characteristics.

Iyo Hasegawa

Embodiment of Fractal

2015 PANEL FINALISTS

This design visualizes of a new possibility for Japanese forestry. Japan has a very low rate of consumption of thinned-tree materials, despite forests covering 66% of the country. One reason is that narrow pieces of timber (120 mm or less in diameter) are not recovered for use, and are instead simply scattered throughout the forests.
The chief feature of Embodiment of Fractal is design based on the growth fractal of conifers in order to use small-diameter pieces efficiently. The designer developed an original material selection method to configure this structure out of small-diameter pieces of wood. He minimized the manufacturing process so that each post retains its organic form. Six different size variations tailored to human scale can change the medium according to the application; for example, shelves, tables, or even chairs. Using a surround consisting of many posts, spaces can be created to give the sensation of being in a forest.
The natural elements translate as experience via sight and touch for a potential understanding of nature.
Japan is not the only country with this forestry issue. Therefore, this product is intended to serve as a template for applications using local woods in different countries. There is also potential for collaboration between technology and traditional regional crafts.

Designer: Hiroyuki Morita

Hiroyuki Morita was born in 1991. He launched the “studio Rope” activity in 2014, based on which he published a work on the theme of “luring the senses,” written from a structural and materials application perspective.

Hiroyuki Morita

Braille Reader

2015 PANEL FINALISTS

In approaching the theme of this competition, the “senses”, the designer wanted to help blind or visually impaired individuals gain access to more of what those with sight take for granted in everyday life. Compared to the sighted, a blind person normally experiences some limitations and restrictions when it comes to accessing information from printed materials. Braille Reader converts visual information into tactile form, thereby providing access to a wide variety of media not published in Braille, such as newspapers, magazines and novels. Empowering the blind or visually impaired with free access to a broad range of information that would be otherwise unavailable aims to help make their lives more fulfilling.

Designer: Jung Juchun

University student Jung Juchun, who majored in product design, aspires to become a proficient product designer. He hopes to make people materially better off and to improve their quality of life through his work. He expects to graduate in 2015.

Jung Juchun

Mnote, Mnemonic Note

2015 PANEL FINALISTS

Our senses are constantly feeding our brain with information about our environments to enable us to react to our surroundings and simultaneously shape our perceptions of our world. Observing how human memory is intrinsically linked to perception led to imagining how our senses can assist our memory capabilities and, particularly, our ability to remember or retain information. In today's rapidly changing world, we are constantly being bombarded with a wide variety of information, leading to over-stimulation of our senses. Over time, we become less sensitive new information and lose the ability to retain such information as tasks to do today, shopping lists, examination notes, and so on...
Mnemonic Note, or Mnote for short, is a writing pad specially designed to take advantage of our senses to improve memory and thereby help us to retain important information. Mnote consists of a series of note-taking styles which turn information into a form that the brain can retain more efficiently than is possible with the original form. Mnote users will be able to take notes creatively on one of a variety of note-taking canvases and then recall the information by means of the semantics relating to that particular Mnote canvas. Let your creativity flow into your memory.

Designer: Benjamin Xue

Benjamin Xue is a Singapore-based designer who is fascinated by the ways in which design operates at the intersection of science, art, and imagination. Intrigued by how things work, he is constantly on the alert for the little “eureka” moments in our everyday lives which can help to make the world a better place.

Benjamin Xue

INSTAMP

2015 PANEL FINALISTS

Experience the sensitivity of oriental brushstroke calligraphy by stamping letters of the alphabet _ with INSTAMP!
The soft end of an oriental calligraphy brush allows you to change the expression of a character, depending on the pressure of the first stroke.
INSTAMP provides this same control and effect in a set of ready-made alphabet stamps.
Ordinary stamps are made of a hard material with a flat contact surface that creates a consistent result when pressed on paper. In contrast, INSTAMP is made of a soft material with an undulating contact surface. The results are directly influenced by the degree of pressure and the angle applied by the user to the stamp.
Using INSTAMP enables a person to learn about the relationship between cause and effect, the sense and the shape.

Designer: Yuzo Azu

After studying architecture at university, Yuzo Azu learned visual design at Kuwasawa Design School. He currently works as a designer for an advertising production company.

Yuzo Azu

Here Comes the Sun

2015 PANEL FINALISTS

Sunshine is a precious rarity during the gloomy days of winter. When sunshine passes through a window and enters the room, people can see and feel its warmth both mentally and physically. In northern countries, daylight time gets shorter during the winter months. Sunshine is valuable to all people. It not only brings warmth, but also hope and energy.

Here Comes the Sun is a window-shaped heater that simulates sunshine streaming through a window. Users can not only see but also feel the warmth of the sun. This design mainly employs a carbon fiber electric heater and a LED panel. Compared to traditional heater construction, carbon fiber produces a safer and thinner electric heater. The magnesium alloy shutters are effective at providing warmth. The LED panel can simulate daylight conditions and provide variable weather modes. As the light enters the retina and is conducted through the nervous system to stimulate hormone secretion in the pineal gland, the brain produces cheerful and energetic reactions. Thus, people can be positively motivated by the simulated daylight. When the shutters deliver warmth, simulated sunlight shines in to bring hope. Thanks to Here Comes the Sun, we can see and feel the sunshine!

Designer: Chun-Fu Chen,Chi-Ming Pao

Chun-Fu Chen is a product designer for a ceiling fan company, and Chi-Ming Pao works as a jewelry designer in Taiwan. They are both graduate students in the Product Design Department, Shu-Te University.

Chun-Fu Chen,Chi-Ming Pao

>crosswalk<

2015 PANEL FINALISTS

Accidents involving collisions between motor vehicles and pedestrians remain a daily occurrence all over the world. In response, the designers created an arrow-shaped crosswalk that subconsciously persuades pedestrians to walk in the desired direction.Human senses subconsciously prompt people to notice arrow signs and also tend to deter them from walking against an arrow-indicated direction. This applies to people of all ages, in all parts of the world. Leveraging this subconscious reaction by way of an arrow-shaped crosswalk design, the designers aim to help make crossings safer for pedestrians.

It could be said that this design concept stimulates not only the five senses but also people's “sixth sense.”
The designers have succeeded in creating a process that is understood intuitively by anyone, regardless of nationality, language or age.

Designer: Naoki Kaminaka,Ryo Yamaguchi

Naoki Kaminaka is a creative director, art director, fairy tale author, playwright, and copywriter who has won awards in several different genres. Ryo Yamaguchi is an experienced advertising graphic designer, currently working as a freelancer.

Naoki Kaminaka,Ryo Yamaguchi

Iris

2014 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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The glass lamp Iris is made of a handblown crystal sphere, shimmering in different colours from every angle. An inspiring luminary piece.

Designer: Sebastian Scherer

Berlin based interior designer Sebastian Scherer attracted international attention with his x-chair in 2010 and was nominated for the Design Preis der Bundesrepublik in 2012 with his Aluminium Series.

Sebastian Scherer

Mentor: Robin Hunicke

Robin Hunicke is a game designer and producer, with a background in fine art, computer science and applied game studies. Her titles include the award-winning PSN downloadable title, Journey, Steven Spielberg's Boom Blox series for the Nintendo Wii, MySims, and The Sims2. In the fall of 2012, she co-founded Funomena, an independent game development studio in San Francisco. Recognized as an influential Woman in Games, Robin is an evangelist for diversity of thought and participation in game design and game culture. She promotes the MDA approach to game design, co-organizes the annual Experimental Gameplay Workshop, has chaired the IndieCade Festival of independent games.

Robin Hunicke

Macian

2014 PROTOTYPE WINNER

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This den building kit is a collection of simple components; which serve a purpose to help the user engage in systematic creativity by constructing ideas using the environment.

Designer: James Fox

James' process takes a human-centered approach to design. This is visualized through the designer's tool kit, which communicates assistance to the needs of people, opportunities and experiences.

James Fox

Mentor: Arthur Huang

Educated in Cornell University's B-ARCH and Harvard's Graduate M-Arch II programs, Huang developed a multi-disciplinary maker-doer ethos at a young age inspired by history, structure engineering and biology. With no industry precedents in sight, he decided to start a company to pioneer the transformation of universally accepted carbon minimizing concepts into physical products/materials. Huang established MINIWIZ in 2005 in New York and in 2006 in Hong Kong. Since then, the company has grown into an international eco-material, building-module and design company.

Arthur Huang

E-Wheel

2014 AWARD WINNERS

E-Wheel offers a new cutting-edge design for electric-assist bicycles. The E-Wheel can be integrated into conventional or folding bicycles and also uses wireless technology for remote control and battery charging.

Designer: Phuoc Nguyen

Phuoc Nguyen is a 4th year student at Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, Vietnam, studying Mechanical Design Engineering, interested in the motion of things that inspire innovative ideas.

Phuoc Nguyen

Flynote

2014 AWARD WINNERS

Flynote is a revolutionary record-player linking past and future. It uses ew technologies to reproduce sound quality that can only be achieved with vinyl.

Designer: Aldo De Carlo,Judith Ccasa Cacere

alDith a partnership between architecture students Aldo De Carlo and Judith Ccasa Caceres, young designers seeking ways to make their passions into a career.

Aldo De Carlo,Judith Ccasa Cacere

Ooho!

2014 AWARD WINNERS

"Ooho!" encapsulates water within a double gelatinous membrane using the culinary technique of spherification. It creates a new alternative packaging, which is simple, cheap, resistant, hygienic, biodegradable, and even edible.

Designer: Rodrigo García González, Pierre Paslier, Guillaume Couche, Pierre Paslier

Pierre Paslier, Guillaume Couche, and Rodrigo García González Pierre Paslier Rocks Lab” in New Zealand. Today they are based in London in the Innovation Design Engineering Department at Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art.

Rodrigo García González, Pierre Paslier, Guillaume Couche, Pierre Paslier

PAUSE

2014 AWARD WINNERS

Pause is a radical design that redefines the perception of time. The concept brings together time-telling devices from different eras to create a playful yet potent design.

Designer: Stuti Mazumdar,Rajeev Dave

Stuti & Rajeev are students of design with unconventional backgrounds, bringing different perspectives to the design process that make their concepts unique. They design for fun and to bring innovation to everyday life.

Stuti Mazumdar,Rajeev Dave

Sky Lighthouse.

2014 AWARD WINNERS

Sky Lighthouse contains the blue color of the sky, the red color of sunset, and the beautiful gradient of color in between. The colors of this lighting object represent a whole spectrum of "natural phenomena."

Designer: Yoshiki Matsuyama

Born in Yokosuka City, Japan in 1987, Yoshiki Matsuyama founded “Ateliers Yoshiki Matsuyama” in 2011 and has worked as an in-house designer for major electronics manufacturers from 2012 to present day.

Yoshiki Matsuyama

DICECOVER

2014 AWARD WINNERS

Dicecover is a sensor-based dice board designed to excite our innate curiosity, stimulate our playful nature, and invite us to discover more about our multidimensional planet.

Designer: Mansour Ourasanah

Mansour Ourasanah is a US-based designer with a passion for storytelling. His work tackles complex social problems through poetic solutions that improve our daily experiences and deepen our understanding of the world in which we live.

Mansour Ourasanah

Game of Space

2014 AWARD WINNERS

Game of Space gives users of the structure a sense of the flow of time. The arrangement and order of the walls give a feeling of constant flux within static homogeneity.

Designer: Nan Lei,Xinyi Wang

IAO architecture endeavors to pursue architecture with specificity towards time and place, cultural relevance towards traditional Asian aesthetics, and a retrospect towards daily experience.

Nan Lei,Xinyi Wang

JoyCarpet

2014 AWARD WINNERS

JoyCarpet is an interactive carpet that helps babies develop their potential. It uses flashing lights for attraction and sound as a reward to make babies love to crawl more.

Designer: Meng-Ling Yang

Yang Meng-ling is an industrial designer with 4 years experience who graduated from Domus Academy (Italy) and NCKU (Taiwan). She focuses on the relationship between products and humans. Now, her field extends into interaction design.

Meng-Ling Yang

PIXIMOT

2014 AWARD WINNERS

Piximot is an interactive screen of rotating wooden cubes that simplifies the surrounding environment by forming a pixelated moving image, provoking intrigue and curiosity in the viewer

Designer: Mami Kim,Joe Hardy

MAMIKIM & Co. is a London based design practice founded in 2012.
By turning mundane objects into playful & interactive products their work has both immediate and long-term appeal, with a fundamental appreciation for good craftsmanship.

Mami Kim,Joe Hardy

Crane

2014 AWARD WINNERS

Crane, a bookshelf, allows lightness and movement within it. Placing or picking up a book creates a gentle swaying of the construction and a playful interaction between person and object.

Designer: Ronen Bavly,Ornit Arnon

Magenta is a product design and manufacturing company.
Their products are the outcome of a creative dialogue between designers and craftsmen.
They are drawn to the primitive character of objects and aim to maintain the presence of material in it.

Ronen Bavly,Ornit Arnon

INAHO

2013 AWARD WINNERS

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Inspired by an ear of rice slowly swaying in the wind, the interior light glows gold in the dark and gently leans towards people when they approach it.

Designer: Hideki Yoshimoto,Yoshinaka Ono

tangent: is a design brand based in London and Tokyo, founded by Hideki Yoshimoto (Royal College of Art) and Yoshinaka Ono (Dentsu Inc) in 2013. It uses the essence extracted from nature and digital technology as the core of its creation.

Hideki Yoshimoto,Yoshinaka Ono

Mentor: Sam Hacht

A graduate of the Royal College of Art, Sam Hecht founded Industrial Facility, his studio, in 2002, with Kim Colin. Hecht designed for many renowned brands like Panasonic, Muji and Droog, which received numerous awards.

He also worked for the architect David Chipperfield and IDEO. Hecht believes in the importance of design as a means of simplifying lives in an inspirational way.

Sam Hacht

Making Porcelain With an ORIGAMI

2013 AWARD WINNERS

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By casting using a type of paper, free-form porcelain can be created, and thinner than by conventional methods. This technique will give rise to new possibilities of porcelain.

Designer: Hitomi Igarashi

Graduated from Tama Art University, Department of Product Design in 2013.

Hitomi Igarashi

Mentor: Junya Ishigami

Born in Kanagawa, Japan in 1974, Junya Ishigami graduated from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music with an M.F.A. in Architecture. His public works include Kanagawa Institute of Technology KAIT workshop (Atsugi), and Yohji Yamamoto (Y's) New York Gansevoort Street Store (New York). In 2005, he focused on furniture and worked as special designer for the Lexus L-finesse Modern Japanese Art Meets Automotive Design.

Awards include the BCS Prize in 2009, the Golden Lion Awards as part of the 12th International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale in 2010 and the Commissioner for Cultural Affairs Awards in Japan in 2012. He is the author of Another Scale of Architecture and other books.

Junya Ishigami

Bscooter

2013 AWARDED WORKS

Electric scooter specially designed for short trips inspired by the Swiss knife. The seat, handlebars and footboards are hidden inside the case when the scooter is folded.

Designer: Álvaro Fernández, Pablo Figuera

Álvaro Goula and Pablo Figuera established their own design studio in September 2012, although they have been working together since they started their studies at ELISAVA. Products already produced include the Savage collection or the Folio lamps, which will soon be up for sale. Their work has been exhibited in Barcelona, Stockholm, Frankfurt and Madrid and have been awarded with the Design Plus and the Injuve among others.

Álvaro Fernández, Pablo Figuera

Calm Kayak

2013 AWARDED WORKS

Calm Kayak is not designed for use in extreme sports. Its main purpose is to comfortably float on a calm river, lake or a city canal while reflecting one's personal thoughts.

Designer: Mani Zamani

Mani Zamani, product designer, craftsman and digital artist, graduated from the Design Academy Eindhoven and HDK School of Crafts and Design in Gothenburg, Sweden. Zamani's digital work and wooden creations have gained much attention in the international creative community.

Mani Zamani

FLY

2013 AWARDED WORKS

An LED-based lighting device, depicting birds in flight, equally distribute the number of people in a given area.

Designer: Dong Bo Cai,Zong Han Tsai

Dong Bo Cai studies at the Department of Communications Design, Shih Chien University, Taiwan. Zong Han Tsai studies at the Department of Industrial Design, National United University, Taiwan.

Dong Bo Cai,Zong Han Tsai

KLAVA lamp

2013 AWARDED WORKS

The combination of geometry and masses distribution allows the lamp to stay in balance in any position with the effect of different light settings.

Designer: Rudy Davi

Rudy Davi is an architect with 8 years experience between Holland and Italy. He graduated in Venice and since 2009 he has run his own studio in Italy working in the architecture and design field. Shape and mechanics are his language.

Rudy Davi

Natural Motion for Natural Music

2013 AWARDED WORKS

This concept started out by seeking for the proper meaning of motion in our lives. The design utilizes the most basic elements of motion to function (without any user knowledge).

Designer: Moonchul Kim

Moonchul Kim is a Product designer currently working at Fuseproject of San Francisco. He graduated from Hong-ik university in South Korea and worked for companies such as Industrial Facility, Lunar design , Mike & Maaike.

Moonchul Kim

Slides Bridge

2013 AWARDED WORKS

The Slides bridge brings a little surprise to our ordinary life, people can slide down the bridge like a child. It makes people happy and laugh.

Designer: Zhu Fei,Zhu Tian Hui

Zhu Fei, sculptor and designer.
Creator of seventeen shortlist works in nine designboom competitions.
THE PUBLIC CHOICE AWARD of Microsoft's the Next-Gen PC Design Competition 2007 THE FIRST PRIZE OF Radostar Prize CHINA2011

Zhu Fei,Zhu Tian Hui

The drinking fountain

2013 AWARDED WORKS

Luxury fountains are out of date. Tap water is transformed into butterflies, dragonflies, spiders, cherry blossoms, and an arabesque pattern. Simple, small yet beautiful.

Designer: Yuki Sugihara,Toshiko Suzuki,Munetaka Ishikawa

Atelier OPA endeavors to create product design, art, interior design, and architecture with an original touch.
Yuki Sugihara, Ph.D., artist, Toshihiko Suzuki, Professor of Kogakuin University,architect, and Munetaka Ishikawa, designer.

Yuki Sugihara,Toshiko Suzuki,Munetaka Ishikawa

Tumbleweed Desert

2013 AWARDED WORKS

This platform changes shape to harness wind energy, allowing it to travel vast distances to monitor land condition and plant seeds, which in turn leads to protecting homes from the spreading desert.

Designer: Shlomi Mir

Shlomi Mir is an Industrial/Interaction designer with five years of experience in developing E.O.D. robots and interactive science exhibits. As a student at Bezalel Academy, Jerusalem, Shlomi won the Tel Aviv's Architect Award in 2012.

Shlomi Mir

weaving a home

2013 AWARDED WORKS

The tent is reinvented with a structural fabric to become a proud home for displaced persons, empowering them to weave communities-and go beyond mere survival.

Designer: Abeer Seikaly

Abeer Seikaly is a RISD graduate in Architecture & Fine Arts. She has worked on luxury retail projects around the GCC, directed the 1st contemporary art fair in Jordan (SAF) and won The Rug Company's Middle East Wall Hanging Competition 2012.

Abeer Seikaly

World Clock

2013 AWARDED WORKS

This World Clock can show any time zone. Rotate the clock so the city name is on top. The hands remains still and show the time in that city. Jump over time differences easily.

Designer: Masafumi Ishikawa

1981 Born in Aichi Prefecture, Japan.
2007 Graduated from Chiba University.
2007 Entered in TOTO LTD as product designer.

Masafumi Ishikawa

Sir David Adjaye

2018

Sir David Adjaye OBE is the principal and founder of Adjaye Associates. Born in Tanzania to Ghanian parents, his broadly ranging influences, ingenious use of materials and sculptural ability have established him as an architect with an artist’s sensibility and vision. His largest project to date, the $540 million Smithsonian Institute National Museum of African American History and Culture, opened on the National Mall in Washington DC in fall of 2016 and was named Cultural Event of the Year by the New York Times. In 2017, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and was recognized as one of the 100 most influential people of the year by TIME magazine.

Shigeru Ban

2018

Born in Tokyo in 1957. Graduated from the Cooper Union. Started working for Arata Isozaki & Associates in 1982. Founded Shigeru Ban Architects in 1985. Became consultant to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in 1995. Established the NGO, Voluntary Architects' Network (VAN) in the same year to support disaster relief. Selected works include Nicolas G. Hayek Center, Centre Pompidou- Metz, and Oita Prefecture Art Museum. Recipient of multiple awards, including Grande Médaille d'or de l'Académie d'architecture (2004), Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize in Architecture (2005), Grand Prize of AIJ (2009), Honorary Doctorate from Technische Universität München (2009), L'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, France (le grade d'officier) (2010), Auguste Perret Prize (2011), Art Prize from the Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs (2012), L'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, France (le grade de commandeur) (2014) and JIA Gran Prix (2016). Served as Professor at Keio University (2001-2008), Visiting Professor of Harvard University GSD and Cornell University (2010), and currently Professor at Kyoto University of Art and Design (2011-), Guest Professor at Keio University (2015-). Laureate of the 2014 Pritzker Architecture Prize.

Alice Rawsthorn

2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014

Alice Rawsthorn is an award-winning design critic, who has written about design for the New York Times for over a decade. Her latest book Hello World: Where Design Meets Life explores design's impact on our lives. Her next book, Design as an Attitude, is to be published in May 2018 as a survey of design today. Alice speaks on design at important global events including TED and the World Economic Forum's annual meetings at Davos, Switzerland. Based in London, she is chair of trustees of the Chisenhale Gallery and the contemporary dance group Michael Clark Company, and a trustee of the Whitechapel Gallery. Alice was awarded an Order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to design and the arts.

Interview with Alice Rawsthorn >

Paola Antonelli

2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013

Paola Antonelli is Senior Curator of Architecture & Design at The Museum of Modern Art, as well as MoMA's founding Director of Research & Development. Her goal is to promote design's understanding, until its positive influence on the world is universally acknowledged. Her work investigates design's impact on everyday experience, often including overlooked objects and practices, and combining design, architecture, art, science and technology. She has curated numerous shows, written several books, and lectured worldwide. She has taught at the University of California, Los Angeles; the Harvard Graduate School of Design; and the MFA programs of the School of Visual Arts in New York. She is currently working on an exhibition on the 111 garments that changed the world; on Design Bites, a book about foods from all over the world appreciated as examples of design; and on a book collecting her essays on the different fields of contemporary design.

Interview with Paola Antonelli >

Birgit Lohmann

2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013

Born in Hamburg, Lohmann studied industrial design in Florence before moving to Milan, where she has lived and worked since 1987. She worked as a designer and product development manager for a number of Italian architects and master designers. She has also worked as a design historian for justice departments and international auction houses. As a researcher and lecturer, she has conducted seminars on industrial design at a number of prestigious international universities. In 1999, she co-founded designboom, where she is currently the Chief Editor, Head of Educational Programming and Curator for International Exhibitions.

Yoshihiro Sawa

2018, 2017

Yoshihiro Sawa graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering and Design from Kyoto Institute of Technology. He has held a number of design-related positions since joining Toyota Motor Corporation in 1980, including Chief Officer of Global Design, Planning Division. He became President of Lexus International in April 2017.

Aric Chen

2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013

Aric Chen / Curator Aric Chen is Lead Curator for Design and Architecture at M+, the new museum for visual culture currently under construction in Hong Kong's West Kowloon Cultural District. He previously served as Creative Director of Beijing Design Week, leading the successful relaunch of that event in 2011 and 2012. Chen has curated and organized numerous exhibitions and projects at museums, biennials and other events internationally, and has been a frequent contributor to publications including The New York Times, Monocle, Architectural Record and PIN-UP.

Toyo Ito

2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013

Toyo Ito / Architect Ito graduated from the University of Tokyo, Department of Architecture in 1965. His main works include: Sendai Mediatheque, Tama Art University Library (Hachioji), Taiwan University, College of Social Sciences (Taiwan R.O.C), ‘Minna no Mori' Gifu Media Cosmos, etc. Projects Under development include: National Taichung Theater (Taiwan R.O.C), New Athletic Field and Sports Park in Aomori (tentative title) and several others. Among his many honors are the Architectural Institute of Japan Prize, Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale, Royal Gold Medal from The Royal Institute of British Architects and the Pritzker Architecture Prize.

Jaime Hayon

2013

Jaime Hayon /Artist , Designer Spanish artist-designer Jaime Hayon was born in Madrid in 1974. After studying industrial design in Madrid and Paris he joined Fabrica – the Benetton-funded design and communication academy in Italy- in 1997 where he directed the design department until 2003. Hayon set up his own studio practice in the year 2000 and dedicated himself fully to his personal projects from 2003 onward, today he is one of the most acclaimed creators worldwide.

Tokuo Fukuichi

2016, 2015, 2014

Tokuyo Fukuichi / Former Lexus International Executive Vice President Graduated with a bachelor's degree in art and design, from Tama Art University. He has successfully held various positions in many design related divisions of Toyota Motor Corporation, leading to his current position as the Executive Vice President of Lexus International.

Kiyotaka Ise

2013

Kiyotaka Ise / Former Lexus International President

Formafantasma

2018

Mentoring Movie

Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin are Studio Formafantasma, Italian designer duo based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. They have developed a coherent body of work characterized by experimental material investigations and explored issues such as the relationship between tradition and local culture, critical approaches to sustainability and the significance of objects as cultural conduits.  Their work has been presented and published internationally and museums such as New York's MoMA, London's Victoria and Albert, New York's Metropolitan Museum, the Chicago Art Institute, the Textiel Museum in Tilburg, the Stedelijk's-Hertogenbosch, MUDAC Lausanne, the Mint Museum of Craft and Design in North Carolina and the MAK Museum in Vienna have all acquired Formafantasma's designs for their permanent collections. Andrea and Simone are lecturing and heading workshops in various Universities and Institutions. Currently teaching at the ‘Well Being' and 'Contextual Design' Departments of the Design Academy Eindhoven and they are at the head of the Design bachelor at MADE Program in Siracusa, Italy.

Involved Designs

Testing Hypotheticals

A collaboratively imagined test site that explores speculative relationships between society, technology and the environment.

Sou Fujimoto

2018

Mentoring Movie

Sou Fujimoto was born in Hokkaido in 1971. Graduated from the Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering at Tokyo University, he established Sou Fujimoto Architectsin 2000. In 2016, he has won the 1st prize for“Pershing”, one of the sites in the French competition called 'Réinventer Paris', following the victories in the Invited International Competition for the New Learning Center at Paris-Saclay's Ecole Polytechnique and the International Competition for the Second Folly of Montpellierin 2014. In 2013, he became the youngest architect to design the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London. His notable works include; “Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013” (2013), “House NA” (2011), “Musashino Art University Museum & Library” (2010), “Final Wooden House” (2008), “House N” (2008) and many more.

Involved Designs

Recycled Fiber Planter

Co-fusion textile and green design to repurpose used clothes.

Lindsey Adelman

2018

Mentoring Movie

Decades before founding her eponymous studio, Lindsey Adelman was already designer — just not publicly so. First, she was simply a precarious, curious child, building endlessly in the backyards of suburban New York, uncertain of how to make a career of it; then, an English student at Kenyon College; then, on the editorial staff at The Smithsonian Institutione. Fortunately, there, her accidental discovery of industrial design — in the literal form of a fabricated foam French fry — propelled her off to RISD to make a life of that childhood passion. Today, from her studios in New York and Los Angeles, she manipulates light to create fixtures that are as emotive as they are physically transformative — objects imbibed with their own history and meaning, often unselfconsciously so, that give color and texture and depth to the world around them.

Involved Designs

CO-RKs

A system connecting cork thread, a sustainable material and computational process that generates design products.

Jessica Walsh

2018

Mentoring Movie

Jessica Walsh is a designer & art director working as a partner at NYC based design firm Sagmeister & Walsh. She lectures about design at creative conferences and universities internationally and teaches design at The School of Visual Arts in NYC. Her work has won numerous awards from most major design competitions including Type Director's Club, Art Director's Club, SPD, Print, New York Festivals, D&AD, TDC Tokyo, and Graphis, among many others. She has been awarded Forbes “30 under 30 top creatives designing the future” and Ad Age's “Top 10 Visual Creatives”. Her work has been featured in numerous books & magazines. Clients include the Museum of Modern Art, The Jewish Museum, Jay-Z, Snapchat, Barneys, The New York Times, Levis, Adobe, and Her blog & book “40 Days of Dating” received over 10 million readers and is currently being turned into a movie by Warner Brothers.

Involved Designs

Honest Egg

Connecting Technology (Intelligent Ink Pigment ) and Design (Indicator) to show egg’s edibility.

Snarkitecture

2017, 2016

Mentoring Movie

In 2008 Daniel Arsham and Alex Mustonen founded Snarkitecture, a collaborative and experimental practice operating in territories between art and architecture. Sharing a mutual interest in the intersection of art and architecture since their student days together at Cooper Union in New York, their first commission was for Dior Homme. Deriving its name from Lewis Carroll's fanciful poem “The Hunting of the Snark”, Snarkitecture designs permanent, architectural scale projects and functional objects with new and imaginative purposes, creating moments of wonder and interaction that allow people to engage directly with the surrounding environment. Transforming the familiar into the extraordinary, Snarkitecture makes architecture perform the unexpected.

Involved Designs

PIXEL

A structure to experience the existence of Light YET Shadow.

TRACE

Trace is a clock that uses a liquid with UV rays and discoloration properties, allowing us to visualize the passing time.

Max Lamb

2017, 2016, 2015

Mentoring Movie

Max Lamb's work plays with the tradition of the working rural landscape — the beach as foundry, the quarry as workshop, felled yew trees of the Chatsworth estate as subject and source material. He is equally fascinated by the city, and his ability to adapt and respond to different environments produces designs that are uniquely of their time and place. Max is not committed to a single material or process, nor is he attracted to design as a means to solve problems. Rather he exploits the qualities inherent in a material to draw out its natural tendencies and beauty. His methods are high- and low-tech, and he is both designer and manufacturer, collaborating with foundries and factories as the scale or complexity of the project necessitates. However, there is continuity in the principles that he applies — honesty to material, a celebration of the process and of human capability, and its limitations.

Involved Designs

PLAYER'S PFLUTE

Vegetable YET a Musical instrument provides fun and learning experience.

AGAR PLASTICITY - A POTENTIAL USEFULNESS OF AGAR FOR PACKAGING AND MORE

AGAR PLASTICITY is a project exploring how agar, a gelatinous material obtained from marine algae, can be used as an environmentally friendly packaging material alternative to plastic.

LUZ

Global emotional lighting based on open source technology and programming, Luz is a lighting concept designed to help people in the Polar Regions who are physically and psychologically affected by lack of sunshine or daylight.

Neri & Hu

2017, 2016

Mentoring Movie

Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu, cofounders of Neri & Hu Design and Research based in Shanghai, have been working on projects around the world which incorporate overlapping design disciplines to create a new paradigm in architecture. In 2014, Wallpaper*announced Neri & Hu as 2014 Designer of The Year. In 2013, they were inducted into theU.S. Interior Design Hall of Fame. Neri & Hu believes strongly that research is a key design tool as each projectbrings its own unique set of contextual issues. Providing architecture, interior, master planning, graphic and productdesign services, Neri & Hu recognizes that contemporary problems relating to buildings extend beyond theboundaries of traditional architecture. Rather than starting from a formulaic design, Neri & Hu's work is anchored inthe dynamic interaction of experience, detail, material, form and light.

Involved Designs

HAVING NOTHING, AND YET POSSESSING EVERYTHING

A capsule for mobile living, Having nothing YET Everything.

DADA

DADA is a block toy which can be freely combined using bands, holes, and pegs to stimulate each child's imagination.

Elena Manferdini

2017, 2016

Mentoring Movie

Elena Manferdini, founder and owner of Atelier Manferdini, with offices in Venice,California, has completed design, art and architectural projects in the United States, Europe and Asia including the Pavilion of the Museum of Contemporary Art in LosAngeles. Her firm has collaborated with internationally renowned companies such as Swarovski, and Sephora and her work has been featured in journals and publications including Elle, Vogue and the New York Times. Currently Graduate Chair at the Southern California Institute of Architecture she exhibits internationally and lectures widely having spoken at MIT, Princeton, Tsinghua University and Bauhaus. She was recently awarded the 2013 COLA Fellowship to support the production of original artwork. In 2011 she received a prestigious annual grant from United States Artists (USA) and her Blossom design for Alessi received the Good Design Award.

Involved Designs

STRUCTURAL COLOR - STATIC YET CHANGING

A rug appears Static in design YET Changes with the needs of the user.

Shape Shifters

Shape Shifters is a special cut of garment, applying modular principles to textiles, which allows creating different outfits.

Arthur Huang

2015, 2014

Mentoring Movie

Educated in Cornell University's B-ARCH and Harvard's Graduate M-Arch II programs, Huang developed a multi-disciplinary maker-doer ethos at a young age inspired by history, structure engineering and biology. With no industry precedents in sight, he decided to start a company to pioneer the transformation of universally accepted carbon minimizing concepts into physical products/materials. Huang established MINIWIZ in 2005 in New York and in 2006 in Hong Kong. Since then, the company has grown into an international eco-material, building-module and design company.

Involved Designs

Diomedeidae

Diomedeidae is an interactive art piece that allows us to access a place where the conscious mind seldom focuses.

Macian

This den building kit is a collection of simple components; which serve a purpose to help the user engage in systematic creativity by constructing ideas using the environment.

Robin Hunicke

2015, 2014

Mentoring Movie

Robin Hunicke is a game designer and producer, with a background in fine art, computer science and applied game studies. Her titles include the award-winning PSN downloadable title, Journey, Steven Spielberg's Boom Blox series for the Nintendo Wii, MySims, and The Sims2. In the fall of 2012, she co-founded Funomena, an independent game development studio in San Francisco. Recognized as an influential Woman in Games, Robin is an evangelist for diversity of thought and participation in game design and game culture. She promotes the MDA approach to game design, co-organizes the annual Experimental Gameplay Workshop, has chaired the IndieCade Festival of independent games.

Involved Designs

Sense-Wear

Sense-Wear is a collection of clothes and accessories that emphasize the use of senses. Their primary purpose is to stimulate and improve awareness of our senses, while training us to better use them all. Some Sense-Wear items are designed to mute physical sensations, some to sharpen them.

Iris

The glass lamp Iris is made of a handblown crystal sphere, shimmering in different colours from every angle. An inspiring luminary piece.

Junya Ishigami

2013

Mentoring Movie

Born in Kanagawa, Japan in 1974, Junya Ishigami graduated from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music with an M.F.A. in Architecture. His public works include Kanagawa Institute of Technology KAIT workshop (Atsugi), and Yohji Yamamoto (Y's) New York Gansevoort Street Store (New York). In 2005, he focused on furniture and worked as special designer for the Lexus L-finesse Modern Japanese Art Meets Automotive Design. Awards include the BCS Prize in 2009, the Golden Lion Awards as part of the 12th International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale in 2010 and the Commissioner for Cultural Affairs Awards in Japan in 2012. He is the author of Another Scale of Architecture and other books.

Involved Designs

Making Porcelain With an ORIGAMI

By casting using a type of paper, free-form porcelain can be created, and thinner than by conventional methods. This technique will give rise to new possibilities of porcelain.

Sam Hacht

2013

Mentoring Movie

A graduate of the Royal College of Art, Sam Hecht founded Industrial Facility, his studio, in 2002, with Kim Colin. Hecht designed for many renowned brands like Panasonic, Muji and Droog, which received numerous awards.

He also worked for the architect David Chipperfield and IDEO. Hecht believes in the importance of design as a means of simplifying lives in an inspirational way.

Involved Designs

INAHO

Inspired by an ear of rice slowly swaying in the wind, the interior light glows gold in the dark and gently leans towards people when they approach it.

ABOUT

First launched in 2013, the Lexus Design Award is an international design competition that targets up-and-coming creators from around the world. The award seeks to foster the growth of ideas that contribute to society by supporting designers and creators whose works can help to shape a better future. It provides a unique opportunity for four finalists to work with globally recognized designers as mentors to create prototypes of their designs, and then exhibit them at one of the design calendar's most important events.

UPDATES

UPDATES

The 2018 Grand Prix Winner was selected by a panel of prestigious judges and worldly renowned creators on April 17th during Lexus Design Event at Milan Design Week 2018.

Explore the 2018 winning design.

2018 CREATIVE THEME

2018 CREATIVE THEME

“CO-” is a Latin prefix meaning with or together in harmony.
At Lexus, we seek the harmonious coexistence of nature and society through sustainable design. “CO-” is an approach that allows us to explore our potential and that of our environment by creating new possibilities through collaboration, coordination, connection, and the like.

AWARD PRIZES

AWARD PRIZES

1 Grand Prix Winner (selected from the prototype winners)

4 Prototype Winners (selected from the finalists)

8 Panel Finalists

-Mentor sessions with top designers to develop prototype. -Production budget of 3 million JPY (over $25K) -Invitation to Milan Design Week to display your design. *Note: Only one person per entry will be invited, regardless of whether the winning works are submitted by an individual or a group.

TIMELINE

TIMELINE

Call for Entries - Application PeriodJuly 24th - Oct 8th 2017

the Finalist Screening Session at INTERSECT BY LEXUS TokyoNov 20th 2017

Announcement of 12 FinalistsJan 31st 2018

Milan Design Week - Grand Prix Winner AnnouncementApr 17th - 22nd 2018